Course Descriptions

Summer 2014

Course descriptions reflect the Summer term schedule only. 

Last update: March 5, 2014

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ANTHROPOLOGY
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ANT 150 Cultures of the World

Surveys past and present peoples of the world. Introduces students to diversity and the underlying unity of human culture from evolutionary and ecological perspectives. Suitable for nonmajors.

ANT 305Q Topic: Understanding Organizational Culture

In today’s marketplaces, leading organizations regularly rely on the tools and practices of anthropology. In this course, students will learn about organizational anthropology and how the discipline is being employed by organizations to optimize outcomes in areas such as productivity, messaging & branding, operations, and mission impact. Students will gain valuable insights into organizational cultures as well as applied methods of organizational assessment and transformation used by anthropologists to empower organizations in ever more globalized markets.

BIO 106 Human Impacts on Marine Ecosystems

Introduces students to marine ecosystems and the impacts of human activities on marine flora and fauna. Addresses contemporary issues of exploitation, pollution and conservation, and their ecological consequences. Lab course designed for non-science majors.

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BUSINESS
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BUS 315C Topic:  Global Sports Business

The main objective of this course is to make students aware of the magnitude of the global expansion and development of sport, to familiarize them with major “players” (firms and organizations) on the global scene, major issues in global sports, and to emphasize the business opportunities that are created internationally. An underlying thesis focuses on the contrasts between the US sport industry and foreign markets.

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COMPUTER SCIENCE
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CMS 495 Topic: Web Mining

Web mining is the automatic discovery of interesting and valuable information from the World Wide Web.  Pursuit of this information can be partitioned into three large sub-topics:  Web Content Mining, Web Usage Mining and Web Structure Mining.  Web Content Mining is the process of information extraction from the web.  This involves techniques from Artificial Intelligence (AI), Database, and most specifically, Data Mining.  Web Usage Mining examines human behavior on the web by observing patterns of hyperlink traversals with mobile agents, and statically examining server logs as well as client histories.  This area depends on fundamentals of graph theory, information retrieval, computer networking, artificial intelligence, and database.  This course will present the fundamentals of these areas required to grasp the roots of Web Mining.  The course will also include a large implementation of a web crawler, web search engine, and an intelligent vertical engine.

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COMMUNICATION
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COM 220 Interpersonal Communication

This course explores communication strategies to interact more effectively in everyday, one-on-one relationships with family, friends, and co-workers.

COM 303 Communication Ethics

This course challenges students preparing for professional and business careers to make moral choices and develop questions when confronted by ethical dilemmas in real-life case studies.

COM 305 Listening

The study of the art of listening and its importance in our personal and professional lives. Students learn to analyze, assess, and improve their own listening abilities.

COM 324 Self-Leadership and Communication

This course explores the many ways that self-leadership skills may be enhanced through effective communication principles, strategies and techniques. Topics to be discussed include rebuilding personal infrastructures, establishing high standards and wide boundaries, eliminating tolerations in life, competing with the past, developing reserves, making the present perfect, becoming a problem-free zone, and much more. Offered on a credit/no credit basis only.

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DANCE
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DAN 177 Jazz I

Introduces fundamental concepts and historical background. Works in studio on body placement and alignment through highly-structured classical jazz warm-up (LUIGI). Values clarity and quality of movement, rhythm, style, and use of dynamics.

DAN 179 Modern I

Introduces fundamental concepts and historical background. Focuses on style, phrasing, mood projection, and changing dynamics.

DAN 277 Jazz II

Concentrates studio work on more complicated combinations, changes of direction, and initiation of pirouettes. Includes historical research, critical studies, and vocabulary building. Prerequisite: DAN 177 or consent.

DAN 279 Modern II

Builds on technique and includes history, theory, and vocabulary. Prerequisite: DAN 179 or consent.

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ECONOMICS
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ECO 254 Latin American Economies

Stresses post-WWII economic issues of growth, inflation, unemployment, income and wealth distribution, and economic development, as well as connection between economic events and politics. Suitable for nonmajors.

ECO 306 Monetary Economics

Examines financial markets and institutions, monetary theory, and macroeconomic implications. Charts the relationship between Federal Reserve and depository institutions, as well as the effects of monetary and fiscal policies on economic performance. Prerequisite: ECO 108, 212 and 213.

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EDUCATION
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EDU 280 Diversity in American Education

Examines cultural pluralism in the classroom: multicultural education, diversity and teaching, bilingual education, racism, tracking, and teacher preparation. ESOL stand alone course.

EDU 309 Foundations of Reading

Examines the foundations of reading instruction from historical, linguistic, social, psychological, cognitive, and curricular perspectives. Theoretical base for reading and language arts methodology courses. Explores basic phonics instruction, reading programs in use, nature of reading and writing processes, and balanced approach to reading instruction.

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ELEMENTARY EDUCATION
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EED 369 Children's Literature

Survey of the genres of literature for elementary school-aged children. Emphasis on techniques used to implement literature across the elementary school curriculum. Reviews recent research, major authors and illustrators, and literature circles as means of instruction.

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ENGLISH
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ENG 140 Composition: Writing About Language and Culture

Develops students' ability to write college-level essays by practicing strategies of argumentation and by refining skills of invention, revision, and critical thinking. Leads to writing essays characterized by unity, order, coherence, completeness, clarity, and mechanical correctness. In order to satisfy the College's general education requirement for writing (W), students must receive a grade of C or better in the course. Section topics are designated by individual instructors. This course (or an equivalent) must be taken during the first semester at Rollins. Formerly ENG 101. Does not count as elective credit in the English Major or Minor or the Writing Minor.

ENG 231 The Bible as Literature

Considers the Old and New Testaments as works of creative literature and includes frequent excursions into poems, plays, music/musicals, and novels influenced by the Bible. Prerequisite: ENG 140 or equivalent.

ENG 300B Expository Writing: Informal Essay

This course offers students writing practice in the informal essay, a form of writing characterized by self-reflection, individual tastes and experiences, open form, and conversational manner. Early practitioners include E.B. White, Joan Didion, and John McPhee. Students will study the primary qualities demonstrated by these and other masters of the informal essay:narrative techniques, flexible structure and design, unity and order, rhetorical intent, and tone. Prerequisite: ENG 140 or equivalent.

ENG 300E Expository Writing: Documented Investigation

This course examines a variety of investigative genres: proposals, interviews, arguments, persuasive letters, as well as source-based reports and essays. As a final project in the course, students may investigate a problem facing one of their communities -- family, work, neighborhood, church, city -- and write a well-researched paper that explains relevant issues and argues for a solution. Prerequisite: ENG 140 or equivalent.

ENG 329R Contemporary American Fiction: Reimagine the Past

In this class, we will examine how American fiction reimagines history,exposing it as a narrative driven by perspective and power.  We will consider what these historical retellings reveal not only about the past, but also about the contemporary movement that produced them.  In addition to this guiding theme, we will continue to develop foundational skills in literary and cultural studies including close reading, thoughtful writing, and careful research. Prerequisite: ENG 140 or equivalent.

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ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES
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ENV 120 The Biosphere with Lab

A survey of biological principles which include the structure and function of cells; plant and animal physiology and anatomy; development; genetics; diversity of forms; ecology; and evolution.

ENV 201 Introduction to Historic Preservation

Description not available.

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HUMANITIES
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HUM 315G Topic: American Popular Culture from the Jazz Age to the Vietnam War

A “people’s history” of the first half of the twentieth century. In this class students examine and critique uniquely American forms of expression, developing criteria by which to appreciate and assess these cultural forms. What do each era’s architecture and design styles, celebrities, musical trends, products and other creative modes of expression say about the way Americans see themselves and their culture? What was it that made the late fifties to sixties so different from eras that came before and launched a revolution in the way Americans defined themselves? From Jazz to Rock ‘n Roll, from Marilyn to Muhammad Ali, from the Great Depression to JFK’s “Camelot,” the power of the American collective experience wove a distinctive pattern into the tapestry of the twentieth century.

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INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS
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INAF 311 Politics of Israel & Palestine

Students will focus on critical issues of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, surrounding the failed Oslo peace talks. But they also learn about the conflict's origins in earlier events surrounding the Holocaust. It is essential to comprehend these origins to understand what is happening today.

INAF 315I Topic: China in the World Order

The main objective of the course is to assess China’s rise as a significant global player, its influence on the world’s economy, its military capabilities and potential, its relationships with other countries in Asia and beyond – especially the United States – and possible scenarios for the future.

INAF 386 South Asian Politics

This course presents a comparative analysis of the political systems including political culture of South Asia, including India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Nepal and Bhutan. Topics include: ancient civilization; the traditions of spiritualism, tolerance of ambiguity, and ideological flexibility in contrast to Western thinking; Mahatma Gandhi's message of non-violence and public aspect of 'dharma' and 'atma'; caste system and its challenge to national integration; and the role/exploitation of religion in the politics of South Asian countries. A special emphasis will be placed on Afghanistan, Pakistan nuclear deterrents, and the war on terrorism.

INAF 415H Seminar: Arab Demcratc Spring

Description not available.

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INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES
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INT 100 Learning Strategies Seminar

The Learning Strategies Seminar is a one semester credit course designed to assist students with becoming responsible learners through self-management and use of academic support services. The course will address strategies for academic planning and time management, motivation, learning styles, study skills, managing stress, and other life adjustment skills. Prerequisite: Advisor Approval.

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LATIN STUDIES
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LAC 205C Topic: Latin America in Film

Description not available.

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MATHEMATICS
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MAT 103 Quantitative Reasoning

Covers collection of data and analysis of everyday quantitative information using spreadsheets or statistical packages. Touches upon population vs. sample, parameter versus statistic, variable type, graphs, measures of center and variation, regression analysis, and hypothesis testing.

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PHYSICAL EDUCATION
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PED 101 Health and Wellness

Emphasizes self-awareness and responsibility in maintaining health. Deals with consumerism, emotional health, intimate relationships, stress management, nutrition, fitness, disease prevention, and individualized behavior modification.

PED 201 Physiology of Exercise Performance

Explains physiological fundamentals of physical fitness and training techniques. Discusses biological energy systems, aerobic exercise, muscular fitness, and training techniques. Encourages students to design individualized programs.

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PHILOSOPHY
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PHI 304 Ethics for Social Change

This course will explore the relationship between personal philosophy, religious conviction, ethical commitments and devotion to social change.  Using the lives of a number of historically important individuals as case studies (including Ghandi, Dorothy Day, Malcolm X, Dietrich Bonhoeffer, Osama Bin Laden and Aung San Suu Ky), we will examine common and uncommon sources of inspiration and motivation.  Students will be encouraged to examine their own motives and roles in society. Formerly PHI  308E.

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PSYCHOLOGY
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PSY 211 Social Psychology

Presents a broad account of how the actual or imagined presence of others influences thoughts, feelings, and behaviors. Touches upon conformity, attraction, prejudice, aggression, group decisions, and attitude change, as well as advertising, law, and indoctrination. Prerequisite: PSY 101. Corequisite for psychology majors: PSY 301, 304.

PSY 303 Lifespan Development

An introduction to the study of human growth and change over the lifespan. Topics include prenatal development, cognitive development, attachment, personality, social development, and gerontology. These topics form a basis for a discussion of the major theories of human development including cognitive development, social learning, and psychoanalytic models. Prerequisite: PSY 101. Corequisite for psychology majors: PSY 301, 304.

PSY 304 Statistics and Decision Making

This course introduces descriptive and inferential statistical procedures for the social sciences. Topics covered include scales of measurement, probability, measures of central tendency and variability, null hypothesis testing using single or multiple samples, correlation and regression, and both inferential and procedural errors individuals can make when calculating and interpreting statistics. Course must be completed as student declares psychology as a major. Individuals with insufficient mathematical preparation are encouraged to complete remedial work prior to enrolling in the course. Prerequisite: PSY 101 and high school algebra or equivalent.

PSY 315V Topic: Sensation and Perception

The course is an introduction to the psychophysical, physiological, and cognitive aspects of human sensation and perception. The material will include exploration of both visual and auditory sensation; the visual perception of color, objects, depth, and movement; the auditory perception of speech; and the effects of visual and hearing impairments on the perceptual systems. Prerequisite: PSY 101. Corequisite for psychology majors: PSY 301, 304.

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RELIGION
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REL 126 New Testament

An Introduction to the origins of Christianity, to the New Testament as the primary source of Christian thought and practice for nearly two millennia, and to modern critical methods in the research of the biblical text. Themes include the nature of Jesus as the Messiah, the "Kingdom of God," sin and salvation, the relationship of Christianity to Judaism, what it meant to be a Christian in the Roman empire, human interactions in the Christian community, and views about Christianity and history.

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SPANISH
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SPN 101 Elementary Spanish I

Grammar, readings, cultural material, intensive oral practice, optional language laboratory. Not for native speakers or advanced students.

SPN 201 Intermediate Spanish I

Reading, writing, speaking, grammar review. Prerequisite: SPN 102 or equivalent.

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THEATRE
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THE 204 Villains of the Silver Screen

In-depth study of villainy in the cinema analyzing motivation, process and consequences, expected and unexpected. Examines the history of villainy in the film industry. Evil doers of both sexes will be discussed and compared, along with the psychological motivation that detoured them from the “John Wayne” path of life. Explores the sociological and pathological factors that create evil. Formerly THE 201.

THE 220 History of American Film Musicals

Starting with the 1920s, the content will involve trends, performers and, of course, influential movie musicals. All elements of each film-music, dancing, book, staging, costumes, etc. will be discussed, compared and contrasted. This course deals with the history of one of the most uniquely American contributions to the world of entertainment - the musical film. Previously THE 306.